New designers: all you need is love

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The annual New Designers exhibition in London is both inspiring and intimidating. The talent and innovation on show continues to inspire visitors year after year, many of whom are there for the express purpose of employing the graduate designers or buying their work. For the 3,500 graduate designers who are showcasing themselves at New Designers, the quality and range of work on show can be intimidating. If you don’t win one of the 26 prizes awarded (and the maths suggest that exhibitors have a one in 134 chance of winning) then how are you noticed?

The elephant in the room – and the Business Design Centre is capacious enough for several herds of them – is that the majority of the exhibitors will not fulfil their current ambitions of becoming professional textile designers, jewellers, ceramicists, etc. True, most will apply their design thinking and sensibilities professionally, but not in the vocational sense that far too many courses continue to suggest they will. Far too few design tutors appear to understand, or show much interest in, the seismic shifts in work, enterprise and employability that are taking place today. I have written about this elsewhere. As the competition becomes more acute, then our graduates need to become ever more enterprising and entrepreneurial in their approach, especially at events like New Designers. It is no longer enough to display fantastic work and expect one’s talent to be instantly recognised. Something else is needed: love.

In the last two days at New Designers I’ve had a number of conversations with award judges, design consultants and others about what they’re looking for, and the answer is fairly consistent: love and passion. They expect that the design graduates make their work “come alive” with their evident love for what they do and the passion that they bring to it. They want the story: why does this work exist? What does it mean? Where is it going? They want evidence that the graduate understands people and how their practice fits into their world. They want to be told about idealism and ambition. And they want somebody they can get on with. No pressure there, then. Generally, our Dundee graduates are good at this. Yet again this year one of them beat the odds of one in 134 and won a major award, and others have succeeded in gaining recognition, placements, commissions, etc. But it is the ones who naturally exude the love and passion that succeed first.

I am of the view that ALL graduates are capable of doing this, if they work at it. These are key steps.

1. Have a story.

Who are you? Why do you do what you do? What does it mean to you? How did you get to where you are now? What excites you? Where do you want to be? If you are not clear on your backstory, then you cannot engage others. The story needs to be authentic and vivid. But begin by writing it out and practicing different ways of telling it. That story needs to underpin your social media presence.

2. Breathing, body language, smiling.

How you look, how you stand and the confidence you express are all vital. If you’re hunched with a facial expression that suggests you’re chewing wasps then it’s unlikely anyone will want to know your story. This post on hacking your way to confidence is worth reading.

3. Use social media.

An event like New Designers is ideal for using social media to get noticed and to express your passions. Tweeting about other exhibitors and work you see that is inspiring is essential. So is self-publicity and linking twitter to your blog, Instragram, etc. My page on social media strategy explores this in more detail. The Guardian’s piece tweet your way to a better job provides some great examples.

4. Be a battery charger

A good colleague of mine divides people into two groups – battery chargers and battery drainers. The former bring forward ideas and solutions, they have infectious passion for what they do, they energise those around them. The latter bring forward problems, they require support and encouragement, frankly they can be quite draining. So here’s a question for you. How do you think you’re perceived? How do you come over? What can you do TODAY to demonstrate that you’re a battery charger?

 

 

 

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